Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Another Milestone in the Stages of Our Lives


Ian with Mother Dinah posed for a souvenir photo in our backyard on their way to the Graduation Ceremonies

The other day, our oldest grandson Ian Panda Katague-King graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree from Sacramento State University. Ian is our oldest grandson who has finished college and we are very proud of his accomplishments. Here's what he says on his FB page.

"Thank you for everyone who celebrated my graduation and thank you for everyone who said congrats. Its been along 6 years of school but now its time for the next chapter in my life". Here are some photos on this milestone in our life









Next month, our second oldest grandson Philip Winchester Katague, oldest child of our oldest son, Diosdado will graduate with a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz Porter College.

That same week, Philip youngest sister, Marina Brewster Katague will graduate from Northgate High School in Walnut Creek, California. Marina has been accepted and will attend California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo this Fall.

Our youngest grand daughter Carenna Katague Thompson will finish 6th grade this year from a local Catholic school and will start Junior High school in their neighborhood public school in Sacramento.

Our oldest grand daughter Elaine Katague King will graduate from Oregon State University in Corvallis, Oregon next spring. 2016

Last but not least is our other grand daughter Alix Katague who will be a Junior in Cornell University in Ithaca, New York this Fall.

The graduation of two of our grand children in college is another milestone in our life here in the US which started in 1960 and had been discussed in details in my personal blogs and writings.

Wishing you all a Happy Summer Vacation. May you continue following my blogs and make comments if you desire. God Bless You all!

Monday, May 25, 2015

Have You Heard of Gerphil Geraldine Flores?


She sings classical songs with a perfect pitch according to David Foster, one of the judges in the recent Asia's Got Talent Competition. Her songs I like as did millions of viewers who voted for her. However she was ousted in the Phlippine's Got Talent Contest because she sings clasical songs according to the latest news gossips. Here's some of her videos and judge for yourself.



Gerphil Geraldine Flores is a Filipina classical singer and a fifth-year student from the University of the Philippines, Diliman (UPD). She finished third in the first season of Asia's Got Talent (AGT), the first pan-regional edition of the global “Got Talent” format.

She became inclined to classical music at an early age. She began singing classical songs when she was only 8 years old. She never had any formal traning and her mother was her vocal coach.

In 2010, she joined Pilipinas Got Talent (PGT) where she only reached the semi-finals. When she auditioned for AGT, she sang “Speak Softly, Love” from the classical film Godfather. Her performance prompted David Foster to press the golden buzzer which automatically sent her to the semi-finals.

During the grand finals on 7 May 2015, she performed “The Impossible Dream” from the musical Man of La Mancha. It earned a standing ovation from the judges and audience members alike. Foster assured Flores of international fame.

In an interview with INQUIRER.net, Flores said that she dreamt of performing in opera houses like The Metropolitan in New York and La Scala in Milan. She also dreams to perform with Andrea Bocelli.

Saturday, May 23, 2015

Old Photos from My Files

I was looking at my old photo files today. Old photos and sweet memories.
MAMA Pacing with Toto Efren, 1949, Barotac Viejo, Iloilo

Dolce building, ancestral home Barotac Viejo, 1953

Our wedding cake decor, Chapel of Holy Sacrifice, Diliman, Q.C.,
1957
Katague Clan 1958 without Eric and me

Above photo, Me and Amor, and Katague clan with Mama Pacing, 1976

UPSCANS with Fr John Delaney, University of the Philippines, Diliman QC.,1952

Mama Pacing and Me, Lapaz, Iloilo, 1976

Thursday, May 21, 2015

Time for Some Jackie Evancho Music

I love to listen to Jackie's voice. She sounds like an Angel to me. Here are some of her videos to enjoy.




If this is the first time you have heard of Jackie, here's a short bio of her from Wikipedia.

Jacqueline Marie "Jackie" Evancho was born on April 9, 2000 and is an American classical crossover singer who gained wide recognition at an early age and, since 2009, has issued an EP and five albums, including a platinum and gold album and three Billboard 200 top 10 debuts.

Between 2008 and 2010, Evancho entered several talent competitions; made singing appearances, mostly in Pennsylvania (including singing the U.S. national anthem at a Pittsburgh Pirates baseball game); issued an independent album, Prelude to a Dream; and attracted interest on YouTube. Evancho impressed composers Tim Janis and David Foster, each of whom included her in his concerts beginning in 2009. Later in 2010, at the age of ten, she gained wider popularity with her performances in the fifth season of the America's Got Talent competition, finishing in second place.

Monday, May 18, 2015

TEN HOURS IN THE EMERGENCY ROOM


TEN Hours in the Emergency Room of this Hospital Last Friday, MAY 15

Last Friday at about 5:30PM, I felt a sharp and lingering pain (Level 4 to 5) on my lower back. I decided to visit the nearby Urgent Care Center about ¼ mile from our residence, since David III was at home to watch for her Mother and my primary care doctor's office was closed. I did not eat dinner, because I thought I will be back in 20 minutes after talking to the clerk at Urgent Care. I have never been to an Urgent Care Clinic and also my first time with this nagging back pain accompanied by frequent urination.

When I arrived at the Urgent Care Center I paid my copay of $30. There were about five patients ahead of me. It was not until 6:30PM when a physician was able to examined me. He indicated there is nothing they can do to be sure that my pain is not serious. They took a sample of my urine and shows no urinary infection. The attending physician recommended I go to the Emergency Room for a CAT SCAN of my abdomen and stomach and lower back, since my stomach was bloated and a slight pain when he palpitated the area during his physical exam. He asked me if I drove, because he recommends I should take their ambulance. When I insisted I drove to the ER he said I will have to sign a waiver that in case something happened to me on the way to the ER Urgent Care is not responsible. He also indicated that If I arrived via ambulance, I will have preference to those who are just walk in to the ER.

I decided to take the ambulance not knowing if my insurance will cover it. While waiting for the ambulance I bought a bag of potato chips- my dinner for the night. I called my son to pick up my car in the parking lot of the Urgent Care Center and to call my daughter in Sacramento ,

The Paramedic took all my vitals and a medical history including the medicines I am currently taking. He also took my blood sugar since I am diabetic. We arrived at the ER with six Police ambulances ahead of us at about 7:00PM.

There were six patients in various stages of trauma ahead of me, so by the time I was able to get a room(cubicle) in the ER it was 10:00PM. More blood and urine samples were taken. An EKG and an IV were done. An order for a contrast CAT SCAN of my stomach area and lower back was in my schedule.

The attending doctor thought I might have a blockage of the bowel, since I had explosive diahrrea with black stool that morning. However she would not know until the cat scan is completed. At about 11.00PM, I was given a big cup of dye for contrast that tasted like chalk. I almost vomited. After consuming the dye, my stomach started to ache (level of pain about 5) I have to ask for pain medication. After one hour of drinking the dye, I was finally wheeled to the CAT SCAN machine. The scan took only a few minutes. It was another hour before the doctor informed I have no blockage, but kidney stones so big and calcified.

By the time we were able to check out, it was 2:30AM. The doctor recommended that I see my primary care physician as soon as possible and get referral to a urologist. I am going to do that today. She gave me also a prescription for pain

WE, referred to my angel, Ditas my youngest daughter who sat down by my bed side to keep me company almost 8 hours. I did appreciate her coming to the ER Otherwise I would have died of loneliness and boredom waiting for 10 hours just for A CAT Scan You will never know the feeling of loneliness, waiting alone in the atmosphere of patients moaning and asking for pain medication. The cubicle next to me was a man complaining of level 10 pain and moaning for Jesus to Help Him It took another hour before he got his pain medication. There was only one nurse station in the ER room that night. In my case my level of pain after drinking the chalk dye was only about 5, but in 30 minutes I got my morphine. After 30 minutes the pain was reduced to level 1 and we were ready to be discharged

Ditas drove me home. I was so hungry I ate the leftover pork chops with gusto. I cooked the chops before driving to the Urgent Care Clinic. Again, thank You, Ditas for keeping me company. And to David who took over taking care of my wife who has Parkinson Disease while I was in the ER..

The hospital mentioned in this article is the The Mercy San Juan Hospital owned by Dignity Health in Carmichael, California.

Sunday, May 17, 2015

ROMANCE BY RUBENSTEIN

Today, Macrine wanted me to play her favorite piano music that she used to play during her teenager years in the Philippines. It is Anton Rubenstein, Romance. I have several piano version of this piece, but the two are violin and vocal versions. I hope you will enjoy it as much as we do.



Thursday, May 14, 2015

Today is May 14-Two Events to Remember

There are two events that I am celebrating and remembering today.

The first event is the 12th birthday of my youngest grand daughter Carenna Katague Thompson. I have written several articles on Carenna's activities and are very proud of her accomplishments in music and in drama.

The second event is the 27th anniversary of the death of my mother, Paz Barrido Balleza Katague.

I have looked at my photo files and here are 2 photos taken on May 14 of that year(1988). If you recognized anybody in the group picture, I will appreciate if you make a comment.

Taken at the Barotac Viejo Catholic Church after the funeral mass and services with the Balleza clan and other relatives. I am the first person on second line from the right.

This second photo was at the Barotac Viejo Cemetery and the Katague plot during the burial ceremonies.

I have written a tribute to my Mother that had been posted in my blogs. The most recent one was last Sunday in celebration of Mother's Day.

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Philippines Schindler's List-An Update

The movie Schindler's List that I posted in my blog recently reminded me of the following article I wrote about four years ago, about the Philippines participation in saving more than a thousand European Jews from the Holocaust.



A friend from the Philippines forwarded this article via e-mail today. I was 5 years old when this was the news. I barely remember it from my parents conversation about World War II. Anyway, if you are a Filipino or Filipino-American, you should read this and be proud of the Philippines.

Monument in Israel honors Filipinos, For saving 1,200 Jews from Holocaustt, By Volt Contreras, Philippine Inquirer dated August 24, 2010.

"MANILA, Philippines—Before Schindler’s List, there was another document—the Philippine visa—that saved hundreds of Jews from the gas chambers and mass graves of the Holocaust.

In 1939, two years before World War II reached the Pacific, the Commonwealth government under President Manuel L. Quezon allotted 10,000 visas and safe haven to Jews fleeing Nazi Europe. Some 1,200 Jews made it to Manila before the city itself fell to Japanese invaders.

Before sunset on June 21, 70 years later, the first ever monument honoring Quezon and the Filipino nation for this "open door policy" was inaugurated on Israeli soil.

The monument—a geometric, seven-meter-high sculpture titled "Open Doors"—was designed by Filipino artist Junyee (Luis Lee Jr.).

At the program held at the 65-hectare Holocaust Memorial Park in Rishon LeZion, Israel’s fourth largest city south of Tel Aviv, the mere mention of "Taft Avenue" by one of the speakers brought Ralph Preiss to the verge of tears.

Preiss, a father of four now in his 70s, later explained that Taft Avenue was where a synagogue-run soup kitchen provided the first hot meals he had as a refugee. He was eight when he arrived from Rosenberg, Germany, with his parents at the port of Manila on March 23, 1939.

"If I stayed in Germany I would have been killed," Preiss, a retired engineer living in Connecticut in the United States, told the Inquirer in an interview.
"My cousin who lived in Berlin and whose father was a lawyer went to Paris [instead]. The Paris police handed them over to the Nazis, and they were sent to Auschwitz and got killed," he recalled, adding:

"I’m very grateful to the Philippines for opening the doors and letting us in."

‘Salamat sa inyo!’

THANK YOU, RP In gratitude for the Philippines’ ‘open door’ policy for Jews escaping persecution in Nazi Europe, a steel monument of three doors was unveiled last week in Israel. VOLT CONTRERAS




El Gamma Penumbra is a Filipino shadow play group from Batangas. The group, which was a finalist in the third season of Pilipinas Got Talent (PGT), earned rave reviews from the judges of Asia's Got Talent (AGT). By giving a tour all over the world through shadow play, the group received praises from all the four judges of the competition - 16-time Grammy winner David Foster, UK pop sensation and former Spice Girl Melanie C, Indonesian rock icon Anggun, and Taiwanese-American pop idol Vanness Wu. The group received a golden buzzer which means they will fast-track to the semi-finals of the show to be held at Marina Bay Sands in Singapore in May 2015.

AGT is the first pan-regional edition of the global “Got Talent” format. It is hosted by Filipinos Marc Nelson and Rovilson Fernandez.

Tuesday, May 5, 2015

Our Neighbor was Lucky at the Casino, Yesterday


Our next door neighbor that comes with us every time we go to the Casino won more than a thousand dollars playing the slot machine, China Shore, yesterday. She can not believed her luck she could hardly speak after the win. Macrine and I were not present when she hit 100 free spins and hit full screen ( Chinese red flowers- see video) and bingo she hit one thousand three hundred dollars. She almost fainted with disbelief as players nearby screamed with delight.

The casino manager asked her SS so she can pay taxes for her win. I told her to talk to the Casino office and ask for documentation of her losses during the last six months. She may be able to document that her wins is less than her losses for the last 6 months so that she may not have have to pay taxes for her win. She plans on talking to the Casino management the next time we visit the Casino, probably in two weeks.

Our lucky neighbor informed us that at about ten minutes before our scheduled departure, she had lost already about $250. While waiting for us, she decided to play again her favorite slot, China Shore located near the Exit Elevator and WOW she hit the 100 free spins. Ten minutes later we arrived and informed her we are ready to go as Macrine was getting tired. She was very quiet, but before we could reach the parking lot, she informed us of what happened. She asked us if we will accept a $100 gift( Balato) from her or she could treat us to dinner. We refused since we already had dinner at the Buffet. We told her we will take a rain check on that dinner invitation.



Personal Note: Do not go to the Casino if the money you gamble is needed to buy your groceries. Casino Gambling can be addicting.

Monday, May 4, 2015

The Town Where I grew Up in the Philippines

Barotac Viejo, Iloilo, Philippines National High School. Me and My sister (Amor) in front of the Sign at the entrance of the school showing our mother's land Donation to the School

The other day, I was finally able to have a person to person talk with my part-time gardener during his lunch break. He is a half and half Japanese-American who grew up in a small town in Hawaii. His father is a Japanese-American with a typical Japanese surname, but his mother is Caucasian. He does not have a Japanese feature so by just looking at his physical appearance you will never associate or guess his mixed ancestry. However, his surname is very Japanese. I have good vibes with him specially when he mentioned about visiting the Philippines several years ago. We got to talk about the hometowns where we grew up.

My chit-chat with my gardener about our home towns has inspired me to repost the following article. I wrote this article about 3 years ago.

If you have not heard of this place, I do not blame you. It is a 4th class municipality about 60Km North of Iloilo City. Iloilo is one of the four provinces in Panay Island. Panay Island is part of the Western Visayas Region of the Philippines. The Visayas Region is the Central Part of the Philippine Archipelago. You may ask me why I am writing about Barotac Viejo, Iloilo (BVI) . Let me explained.

BVI is the town where I grew up. It is the town where I finished my elementary school years. It is also the town where I finished high school. In 1951 I graduated valedictorian of my high school class. It is the town where I have both pleasant and unpleasant memories of my childhood and teenaged years.

My childhood memories of the American-Japanese war occurred in the town proper, foothills and jungles of this town. ( http://davidbkatague.blogspot.com). My memories of my elementary and high school years as discussed in my autobiography , http://theintellectualmigrant.blogspot.com , (Chapter 2 and 3) also occurred in this town.

When I left BVI in 1951 to pursue my college degree in Iloilo City and later in Diliman, Quezon City, BVI was a 4th class town with less than 5000 residents. Today, Wikipedia states that is still a 4th class municipality, but with around 39,000 residents. When I left BVI in 1955, there was the elementary and high schools, public market, Cockfighting Arena, the Catholic Church, the Post office and one gas station, a couple of hardware stores, a Chinese bakery and may be 100 residential homes in the town proper. Today it is still a 4th class town with more buildings both for business and private homes. The local high school was named to be a national agricultural high school. Part of the land for the school was donated by my uncle ( Jose Balleza) and my mother Paz Balleza ( see photo above). There is a beach resort ( Balaring Beach) about 5 Km from the town proper.
Our ancestral home at the back of the Municipal and Post Office building, before it was sold.

When I left the town in 1955, the mayor of the town was Luis Tupas, a relative of my mother. Today the local politics, are still controlled by the Tupas family and their clan. When I left the town, my parents bestowed me a 12 hectare parcel of rice land as part of my inheritance, as discussed in my blog http://lifeinus1960present.blogspot.com. Today that land has been land reformed and I have not received a single centavo from the Philippine government. What was left of my inheritance is a 2-hectare parcel in the upland area without water irrigation and almost useless for crop growing.

So after all this years, almost 57 years, the town has not really changed. I found a Facebook Page about the town last year. Searching in Google, there is not much information about BVI. If you click on the Image Section, two of my pictures are in the first page.

In 2005, my wife and I accompanied by my sister visited our parents grave in the cemetery of BVI.Me and my wife and sister Amor at the Cemetery. Our old house (located at the back of the Post Office) was gone. The only thing that remained was the foundation stone with the engraving Dolce Building, 1952.

Tears from my eyes flowed like a gentle rain, when I saw that foundation, recalling the pleasant memories of my teen-age years. The house is gone but my memories of BVI will live forever. I wish for a better future for BVI and its residents. If you know of someone from Barotac Viejo, Iloilo, I will appreciate your comments.

Friday, May 1, 2015

Have You Heard of Mikey Bustos-An Update

Here's the latest of Mikey Bustos video. I really love this one.



For some reason or another, This is the first time I have heard of Mikey Bustos. So I did some Internet search, and here's what I learned.

Bustos is born from Filipino parents in the Weston neighbourhood of Toronto. Before Canadian Idol, he worked as a temp at the Bank of Montreal. He attended St. Michael's College School in Toronto.

Bustos placed seventh runner-up in the finals of first season of Canadian Idol in August 2003, despite Chart magazine's prediction: "If we were to lay our bets today, ChartAttack’s money would be on Toronto contestant Mikey Bustos, a slightly strange-looking young man with a shaved head and the voice of an angel. From his very first audition where he floored the four judges, he established the largest fan base early in the competition, and made headlines all over the country.

After competing on Canadian Idol, Bustos began performing throughout Canada and the US at many events and showcases at top venues. Mikey also had special guest appearances and interviews at numerous radio stations including CHUM FM, CFMT, Z 103.5 FM, Flow 93.5 FM, Mix 99.9 FM, AM 680 News, CHIN Ottawa FM, CKMS 100.3 FM Waterloo, and has several times appeared on CTV (Etalk Daily/ Canada AM Live), CBC Quebec, and local stations like Omni1 and Rogers .
I enjoyed very much his YouTube satires on the Filipino culture and way of life. Very funny,indeed!

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Guest Article from Susan Creamer Joy

In The Silence, by Susan Creamer Joy.

Today's guest article is from Susan Creamer Joy. Susan is one of my favorite authors in the ViewsHound community. Susan writes, draws, paints and cobbles together art from found objects making a variety of creations from jewelry to religious shrines. She frequently sports burns on her fingers from her soldering iron, paint on her palms and ink under her fingernails, but her hair is usually combed. When she is not losing time in the creative vortex of her studio, she is likely to be putting her knowledge of metaphysics and esoteric principles including Tarot, numerology, astrology and graphology to good use in consultations. Her children are grown, her husband still works and her four dogs believe she needs serious help. The title of her article is "A Matter Of Love And Death". Thank you Susan.

By the time they reached my bedroom door, I was already sitting up – my stomach ratcheted in the tense grip of an unnamed anxiety; my pillow, unburdened of my drowsy head.

To this day I cannot explain how I heard them coming up those stairs in their bare feet or how I knew that my father struggled to hold his composure as my mother unnaturally clutched at the folds of her dressing gown and followed him through the dark just a little too closely.

As the wooden groan of those old stairs tore into my bones that morning like a hacksaw, all I could see between the predawn shadows was the letter I’d written just hours earlier to my boyfriend, Chris, propped against the lamp on my desk across the room awaiting an envelope.

I had not slept well. It was late November and there had been so many changes since the middle of August when he left for the Air Force in Texas to begin basic training and I began my third new school in as many years.

The conspiracy between fate and the last surge of the Vietnam draft had broken apart the every-waking-minutes of our two-year union with unceremonious indifference. All that night my sleep had been infested by difficult dreams and by the illogical fear that truth and reality were merging into a darkness only a martyr could grasp; and at sixteen, martyrdom seemed reasonable only for the nuns among the poor in Bangladesh

I tried to remind myself that he would be home on leave for Thanksgiving in another few days. It was the only tether to calm I could find, but reviewing the facts offered little relief from my baseless fears.

Chris had been girding his pacifist sensibilities preparing to fight in an unpopular war that had not yet slaughtered its last innocent. I was hovering just over the line of inclusion at an exclusive girl’s school – missing him – and finding myself at odds with these young women and their attachment to propriety and with the prep-school veneer that blinded them to the fact that they were no better than anyone else.

Neither one of us was coping well with the worlds into which we were respectively summoned, and although we both knew that the best hope for any future together depended upon our individual successes apart, it was far from comforting most days.

But in spite of our discomfort, we each did our best; and, of course, there were the letters: Thin, plain-paper sheets with row after row after row of inky blue words penned with the intensity and awkward locutions of a love learned too soon. It had come down to just that little, but without them, I would have had nothing.

Chris was learning to fly. I was learning to drive, and both of us were aching to transport our souls to an earlier time through the hallowed intercourse of memories and dreams. Of course, as with all progress, there was the positive element: We were both clean and drug-free for the first time in years.

Now, without pretense, both healthy cognition and sincere motivation surfaced regularly in my psychology and prompted me to care about myself and to arbitrate against all temptation for a better standing in the world, in school and in my own eyes. I even did my homework.

No longer was I escaping today but, instead, living for my day of escape. Lying still in the dark of my room, I listened to the slow, padded footfall of my parents approaching and looked to the floor and to my history book half hidden beneath the nightstand where I’d tossed it the night before. Even in this early morning dark I could make out the swirls and stars in colored marker and the bubble-formed letters that spelled C H R I S in soft, juvenile curves on the torn book cover I’d fashioned out of a brown paper grocery bag.

I vaguely remembered throwing it there somewhat hastily. I had been doing my homework when a sense of urgency struck and I realized I had not written him as I promised I would and glancing at the clock, I noted it was nine-twenty-three. Why that mattered I had no way of knowing in that strange moment, but within hours, it would be one I would never forget; and although I was becoming drowsy and still needed to finish my work, I felt beyond reason that my letter to him could not wait.

So, I wrote. I would always write. I would always be there. He would always be there.“Suzi."It was my name spoken in the smooth and familiar voice of my mother, although weighted and slow, her head bowed to her chest almost as though she were speaking only to herself.

"Suzi.” She said it again, this time with sharp gravity, like a chisel against stone.

As if on cue, I leaned forward, flanked now by my parents who were sitting on either side of my bed.

I had been waiting for them. I don’t know how. I didn’t know why. The lights in my room remained off, but it seemed that the darkness clung more to them than to me, as though they were holding it there – away from me to give me enough light to see through the next moment. They were crying. My father was crying. My father. “Suzi. We have something very, very bad to tell you." Chris has been in a car accident." And he was killed."

If the world moved forward from that moment, I could not know it. f there were air around me worth breathing, I could not take it in. And if there were another sound beyond the leaden bellow of my own raw grief, I could not hear it.

"Who am I going to talk to? Who am I going to love?” I wailed. Who will love me? In that sodden moment violated by the intrusion of a predawn light that had no business rising, everything I ever believed about happiness, hoped for in life, trusted in or held as my own was annihilated.

After that – there was no after that. After that came months of hollow redundancies that would inform my way of being in the world for years to come. A serial commitment to waking up each morning, remembering he was gone and dedicating the remaining hours to forgetting. To that end I would try anything, drink anything, ingest anything, inject anything. It was a slow and arbitrary suicide by indifference.

Many years later, at 25 years-old and in the midst of a pharmaceutical free-fall leaning dangerously close to terminal, I discovered that I was expecting a child, and after a decade of forgetting, I remembered. I named him Griffin after the legendary winged lion, a symbol of the divine because what he inspired and the miracle that he was, were nothing less. I remembered and I loved again, and I went on to marry and to the gift of two beautiful daughters.

Today my son is struggling not to drown in the same well of drug abuse and apathy that almost swallowed me – his great, divine wings clipped by his own hand; and while it is up to him to restore his place in the sky, I will do my best to help provide an open runway.

In the meantime, I will continue soaring for both of us; bequeathed as I have been, with a determination to fly from a boy whose ragged fate precluded that dream.

Death took one young man from me once upon a dark time. If it has any intention of coming for this one, it will have to go through me. And trust me, it will be in for one hell of a fight.

Note: If you enjoy this article, please let me know.

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I love gardening, play duplicate bridge, has collection of orchids, bougainvillas, hibiscus and other tropical plants